Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/48563

The History and Doctrine of American Copyright Protection for Fashion Design: Managing Mazer

Item Summary

Title: The History and Doctrine of American Copyright Protection for Fashion Design: Managing Mazer
Authors: Colman, Charles
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Harv. J. Sports & Ent. L
Citation: Charles E. Colman, The History and Doctrine of American Copyright Protection for Fashion Design: Managing Mazer, 7 Harv. J. Sports & Ent. L. 151, 208 (2016)
Abstract: In order to be copyright-eligible, a component of fashion design must be not only "fixed" and "original" (as discussed in the previous installment of this five-article series, On 'Originality'), but also constitute a work whose aesthetic characteristics are separable from the "utilitarian" material to which it is affixed.1 In this installment of The History and Principles of American Copyright Protection for Fashion Design, I trace the trajectory of the courts'
rulings on the copyrightability of certain aspects of fashion design in the wake of the Supreme Court's pivotal 1954 decision in Mazer v. Stein.' I will begin with a discussion of the background and substance of the Supreme Court's Mazer decision. I will then provide a series of more or less detailed chronologies of lower-court rulings on the copyrightability of fashion design between the mid-1950s and mid-1970s, resulting in the crystallization
of certain categories of presumptively copyright-eligible fashion works-namely, fabric patterns and lace; focal images placed on wearable objects; jewelry design; and some costume works.
Pages/Duration: 57 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/48563
Appears in Collections:Colman, Charles E.



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