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Geology and ground-water resources of the islands of Lanai and Kahoolawe, Hawaii

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dc.contributor.authorStearns, Harold T.
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-06T23:58:23Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-06T23:58:23Z-
dc.date.issued1940
dc.identifier.citationStearns, H.T., 1940, Geology and ground-water resources of the islands of Lanai and Kahoolawe, Hawaii: Hawaii (Terr.) Division of Hydrography Bulletin 6, p. 177 p. (pt. 1, Geology and ground-water resources of Lanai, p. 1-115; pt. 2, Geology and ground-water resources of Kahoolawe, p. 117-173); 1 folded map in pocket (scale 1:62,500).
dc.identifier.citationMacdonald, G.A., 1940, Petrography [of Lanai Island, Hawaii], Hawaii (Terr.) Division of Hydrography Bulletin 6: Geology and ground-water resources of the islands of Lanai and Kahoolawe, Hawaii, p. 61-63; 1 folded map in pocket (scale 1:62,500).
dc.identifier.citationMacdonald, G.A., 1940, Petrography of Kahoolawe [Hawaii], in Stearns, H.T., ed., Hawaii (Terr.) Division of Hydrography Bulletin 6: Geology and ground-water resources of the Islands of Lanai and Kahoolawe, Hawaii, p. 149-173.
dc.identifier.citationSwartz, J.H., 1940, Geophysical investigations on Lanai, in Stearns, H.T., ed., Hawaii (Terr.) Division of Hydrography Bulletin 6: Geology and ground-water resources of the islands of Lanai and Kahoolawe, Hawaii, p. 97-115; 1 folded map in pocket (scale 1:62,500).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10125/50778-
dc.description.abstractIncludes illustrations, tables, diagrams frontispiece, plates, and map.
dc.description.abstractLanai lies 59 miles southeast of Honolulu, Oahu, has an area of 141 square miles, and is 3,370 feet high. (See fig. 1 and pl. 1.) The island produces pineapples and cattle. The surface above about 1,200 feet is generally covered with lateritic soil, which reaches 50 feet. Below this level the island is partly devoid of vegetation and is strewn with boulders, the result of having been once submerged by the ocean to this depth. Traces of various emerged and submerged shore lines are described, the highest fossiliferous marine deposits being 1,070 feet above sea level. Lanai is an eroded extinct basaltic volcano built during one period of activity. No secondary eruptions occurred as on most of the other islands. It has three rift zones and a summit caldera. The summit plateau has resulted from collapse along the northwest rift zone. Elsewhere, there is much evidence of faulting. About 100 faults and 275 dikes were recorded, but they are so close together in places that it was not possible to show them all on the map. The climate is semitropical, the mean annual temperature of Lanai City, altitude 1,620 feet, being 68° F. Because Lanai lies to the lee of Maui Island, it is dry. The mean annual rainfall ranges from 38 inches on the summit to less than 10 inches on the coast. The windward (northeast) side is carved by streams into deep canyons. Maunalei Gulch has the only perennial stream, and it does not reach the sea. Ground water, the lifeblood of Lanai, is scarce. Lanai City obtains some of its water supply by a tunnel from gravel in Maunalei Gulch. This water apparently rises from the dike complex in this gulch. The rest of the supply comes from a recently constructed shaft tapping the dike complex not far downstream. The total quantity of high-level ground water discharged by springs and tunnels ranges from about 600,000 gallons a day in wet weather to about 250,000 gallons a day in dry weather. The basal water, although potable, is fairly high in salt. Several sites are recommended for developing and conserving ground water.
dc.format.extent207 pages
dc.language.isoen-US
dc.publisherAdvertiser Publishing Co., Ltd.
dc.relationhttp://evols.library.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10524/53396
dc.relation.ispartofseriesHawaii (Territory) Dept. of public lands. Division of hydrography. Bulletin 6
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBulletin (Hawaii. Division of Hydrography) ; 6
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUSAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project, Hawaii
dc.subjectgroundwater
dc.subjectgeology
dc.subjectLanai
dc.subjectKahoolawe
dc.subjectHawaii
dc.subject.lcshGeology--Hawaii--Lanai
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater--Hawaii--Lanai
dc.subject.lcshWater-supply--Hawaii--Lanai
dc.subject.lcshGeology--Hawaii--Kahoolawe
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater--Hawaii--Kahoolawe
dc.subject.lcshWater-supply--Hawaii--Kahoolawe
dc.subject.lcshGeology--Hawaii
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater--Hawaii
dc.subject.lcshWater-supply--Hawaii
dc.subject.lcshGeology
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater
dc.subject.lcshWater-supply
dc.titleGeology and ground-water resources of the islands of Lanai and Kahoolawe, Hawaii
dc.typeText
dc.type.dcmiReport
local.identifier.callnumberGB653 .A3 no.6
local.identifier.voyagerid823887
Appears in Collections:Kahoolawe
Hawai‘i Division of Hydrography Bulletins
Lanai



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