Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/64696

Renewable energy in Hawaii: a comparative analysis of wind, solar, and geothermal energy resources

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2019 - Geothermal Energy in Hawaii, Thesis.pdf Thesis 1.71 MB Adobe PDF View/Open
2019 - Geothermal Energy in Hawaii, Presentation.pdf Presentation 1.85 MB Adobe PDF View/Open

Item Summary

Title:Renewable energy in Hawaii: a comparative analysis of wind, solar, and geothermal energy resources
Geothermal energy in Hawaii: a comparative analysis of wind, solar, and geothermal energy resources
Authors:Brennis, Theodore
Contributors:Lautze, Nicole (instructor)
Keywords:Geothermal resources
Renewable energy sources
Date Issued:09 Aug 2019
Abstract:Despite being wholly volcanic in origin, Hawaiʻi has had only one commercial geothermal production facility operating over time. In May 2018, this sole geothermal plant, Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) ceased operations due to the nearby eruption along Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone (KERZ). Hawaiʻi’s geothermal resources are potentially vast, yet they are largely uncharacterized (Lautze et al. 2015). One study completed by GeothermEx Inc. in 2000 estimated that the state of Hawaiʻi could have more than 1500 MW of geothermal energy potential, enough to meet nearly three-quarters of the state’s electricity demand (Hawaiian Electric Company Inc. 2016b; GeothermEx 2000). There are cultural sensitivities around geothermal energy production in Hawaiʻi, which initiate debate that can be a roadblock to further geothermal development. Fully understanding and analyzing such sensitivities is beyond the scope of this report. Instead, this report focuses on geothermal energy’s potential in Hawaiʻi by comparing wind, solar, and geothermal resources in terms of cost, land use, and associated hazards. Facts show that geothermal is a clean, baseload renewable energy that can enable Hawaiʻi to achieve its green energy goals. The subsequent discussion will show that geothermal resources in Hawaiʻi have competitive cost projections, low land use, and hazards that are generally well understood and manageable.
Description:A thesis and presentation for the course Geology & Geophysics 499 - Undergraduate Thesis. This course was offered by the Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
Pages/Duration:50 pages (thesis) and 19 pages (presentation)
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/64696
Appears in Collections: The Geothermal Collection


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