Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69791

Beyond the idealized native speaker in L2 Spanish contexts: Standard language ideology, authenticity, and consequences for learner identity construction

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Title:Beyond the idealized native speaker in L2 Spanish contexts: Standard language ideology, authenticity, and consequences for learner identity construction
Authors:Burns, Katharine E.
Date Issued:01 Jan 2019
Publisher:Cengage
Citation:Burns, K.E. (2019). Beyond the idealized native speaker in L2 Spanish contexts: Standard language ideology, authenticity, and consequences for learner identity construction. The American Association of University Supervisors, Coordinators and Directors of Foreign Languages Programs (AAUSC), 32-52. http://hdl.handle.net/102015/69791
Abstract:Previous studies have been critical of standard language ideologies in universitylevel
L2 Spanish instruction for their role in contributing to the power of
hegemonic groups through their language varieties, for example, Castilian and
Latin American norma culta (Milroy, 2001; Pomerantz, 2002; Valdés et al., 2003).
The notion of a “standard” language has been identified as an abstract construct by
many scholars who have argued that it promotes an image of an idealized native
speaker that is not reflective of authentic conversational contexts (Ortega, 1999;
Pomerantz, 2002; Train, 2003). Therefore, reinforcing standard language ideology
in L2 curricula not only contributes to the power of hegemonic groups while
marginalizing others, it also leaves students unprepared for the linguistic diversity
found in authentic conversational contexts. This study examines the ideological
underpinnings of how sociolinguistic variation in Spanish is presented in beginning
and intermediate-level Spanish as Foreign Language (SFL) and Spanish as a
Heritage Language (SHL) curricula at a large, Southwestern university. Textbooks
were analyzed and focus groups from both SFL and SHL courses were conducted.
This study centers on the focus group interview data, and findings include evidence
of a reinforcement of standard language ideology and particular stigmatization of
U.S. varieties of Spanish in both SFL and SHL courses. It is argued that, at times,
this stigmatization points to an ideology of racialization of Spanish-speakers in the
United States (Cobas, Duany, & Feagin, 2009). In addition, the findings indicate
that the ideology of Spanish as an exclusively “foreign” language is perpetuated, a
claim that has been disputed in regard to the United States, since it is one of the
world’s top Spanish-speaking countries (Train, 2009). Pedagogical suggestions for
program directors and instructors seeking to enact paradigm changes that resist
the discourses of standard language ideology are discussed.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69791
Volume:2019
Appears in Collections: 2019 PATHWAYS TO PARADIGM CHANGE: CRITICAL EXAMINATIONS OF PREVAILING DISCOURSES AND IDEOLOGIES IN SECOND LANGUAGE EDUCATION


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