Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69795

Emerging discourses and practices in language eduaction: Who is driving change?

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Title:Emerging discourses and practices in language eduaction: Who is driving change?
Authors:Terreros, Gorka Bilbao
Bono, Mariana
Date Issued:01 Jan 2019
Publisher:Cengage
Citation:Terreros, G.B., Bono, M. (2019). Emerging discourses and practices in language eduaction: Who is driving change? The American Association of University Supervisors, Coordinators and Directors of Foreign Languages Programs (AAUSC), 133-152. http://hdl.handle.net/102015/69795
Abstract:How do institutional discourses that promote internationalization, crosscultural
understanding, diversity, and a commitment to service affect language
teaching and learning? How can language programs contribute to redefining
educational priorities, replacing a language-as-skill approach by a view of
language as situated and integrated social practice? A Task Force charged
with reexamining Princeton University’s general education requirements for
undergraduate students published a report in October 2016 recommending that
all students take at least one course with international content and one course
that explores the intersections of culture, identity, power, and service. The report
also issued a proposal to expand the language requirement so that more students
reach advanced proficiency. We argue that these recommendations reflect an
ideological shift that is being felt university-wide. Language departments in
particular are at the forefront of current efforts to promote among our students
an intentional and critically engaged examination of a sociopolitical world
characterized by increased mobility, interconnection, multilingualism, and
multiculturalism. This chapter explores the dynamics between institutional
statements and proposals like the aforementioned report and concrete initiatives
by language departments to either respond to instructional goals set by university
stakeholders or to initiate a paradigmatic change themselves. More specifically,
we discuss programmatic reforms that aim to expand our course offerings to areas
of inquiry and focus oriented around international study, culture, identity, and
service. We also look at the ways in which existing courses have been redesigned with these educational priorities in mind. Ultimately, we posit that a sustainable
change of paradigm requires both institutional commitment and support, and
renewed pedagogical models and practices that blend language learning with
critical social and cultural awareness.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69795
Volume:2019
Appears in Collections: 2019 PATHWAYS TO PARADIGM CHANGE: CRITICAL EXAMINATIONS OF PREVAILING DISCOURSES AND IDEOLOGIES IN SECOND LANGUAGE EDUCATION


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