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Languages for all: World languages for meaning-making and intercultural citizenship

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Title:Languages for all: World languages for meaning-making and intercultural citizenship
Authors:Back, Michele
Wagner, Manuela
Date Issued:01 Jan 2019
Publisher:Cengage
Citation:Back, M., Wagner, M. (2019). Languages for all: World languages for meaning-making and intercultural citizenship. The American Association of University Supervisors, Coordinators and Directors of Foreign Languages Programs (AAUSC), 176-198. http://hdl.handle.net/102015/69797
Abstract:As world language (WL) instructors and program coordinators, our primary
goals for our students include developing their target language (TL) proficiency;
using this proficiency in a variety of real-world contexts; and developing richer,
plurilingual identities. Although many resources are available to help educators
reach these goals, balancing linguistic and intercultural objectives is not easy
to do in everyday teaching practice. Thus, in this chapter, we outline how WL
educators can make informed decisions about classroom practices to support the simultaneous development of TL proficiency, intercultural competence, and
plurilingual identities while building bridges between the target language/cultures
and students’ existing languages and heritages. We do this by first drawing
on theoretical frameworks in symbolic competence (Kramsch, 2009, 2011),
intercultural competence and citizenship (Byram, 1997, 2008), translanguaging
(García & Li Wei, 2014; Flores, 2016), and language education for social justice
(e.g., Nieto, 2000; Osborn, 2006; Reagan & Osborn, 2001; Wesely, Glynn, &
Wassell, 2016). We then present findings from interventions we have conducted,
which offer concrete strategies for situating a meaning-making approach within
the current framework of WL education while still supporting the goals of TL
acquisition and communication. Finally, we explore what information and skills
are needed to promote teaching languages for intercultural dialogue and discuss
implications for P-16 WL instructors and language program directors. Specifically,
we outline how we can apply existing research and theory to classroom practices
that draw upon a variety of linguistic and cultural resources to develop meaningful
relationships and language proficiency grounded in relevant social action.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69797
Volume:2019
Appears in Collections: 2019 PATHWAYS TO PARADIGM CHANGE: CRITICAL EXAMINATIONS OF PREVAILING DISCOURSES AND IDEOLOGIES IN SECOND LANGUAGE EDUCATION


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