Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69798

L2 academic and disciplinary discourse socialization in a short-term study abroad context: An autoethnographic inquiry

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Title:L2 academic and disciplinary discourse socialization in a short-term study abroad context: An autoethnographic inquiry
Authors:McGregor, Janice
Date Issued:01 Jan 2019
Publisher:Cengage
Citation:McGregor, J. (2019). L2 academic and disciplinary discourse socialization in a short-term study abroad context: An autoethnographic inquiry. The American Association of University Supervisors, Coordinators and Directors of Foreign Languages Programs (AAUSC), 199-224. http://hdl.handle.net/102015/69798
Abstract:In this qualitative study, I scrutinize my second language (L2) academic and
disciplinary discourse socialization (ADS) as a U.S.-based language educator
leading a study abroad (SA) program in Germany in the context of an interview
interaction with Meike, a language educator and coordinator of the host site’s summer
language course. I recruit a reflexive approach to the examination of the interview
and a reflexive researcher identity memo that I wrote immediately afterward
(Maxwell, 1998). The macroanalysis shows that I experience significant affective
responses around three themes: Auslandsgermanistik (i.e., international German
studies), L2 pronunciation in SA, and SA as “entertainment.” The microanalysis
shows that instead of revealing my affective reactions, I cooperate structurally, or
facilitate the relevant interactional roles (e.g., interview and interviewee), with
Meike when these themes emerge in the interview interaction. Taken together,
the results reveal that my emotions enter into the interview interaction in very
minimal ways because I pursue the maintenance of my role as interviewer and
my/our SA program’s partnership with Meike/the host site. The results of this
project remind us that interviewers are situated, socializing agents who make
coordinated choices with their participants due to the need to negotiate multiple
identities and expertise. This project lends strong support to scholarship that
understands interviewers as non-neutral bodies (McGregor & Fernández, 2019;
Prior, 2017; Talmy, 2011) and compels practitioners to consider the consequences
of their ongoing L2 ADS for their students as well as their own language teaching
and programs.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10125/69798
Volume:2019
Appears in Collections: 2019 PATHWAYS TO PARADIGM CHANGE: CRITICAL EXAMINATIONS OF PREVAILING DISCOURSES AND IDEOLOGIES IN SECOND LANGUAGE EDUCATION


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